CLICK Image to Buy "WHEN LIONS ROAR: The Churchills and the Kennedys"

CLICK Image to Buy "WHEN LIONS ROAR: The Churchills and the Kennedys"
WHEN LIONS ROAR is 'Brilliant' says Washington Post, Buy Now on Amazon

Chris Matthews Likes WHEN LIONS ROAR: The Churchills and the Kennedys"

Chris Matthews Likes WHEN LIONS ROAR: The Churchills and the Kennedys"
"What I like most in Maier's giant work is the spine of this saga, the all-important record of influence the great soldier-statesman-historian's life exerted on the future American president." -- Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC's Hardball, review in Chartwell Bulletin, The Churchill Centre

Saturday, July 18, 2009

Silicon Valley Weighs In with 'Fresh Look' -- NYTimes Review Appears in Mercury News


Author Thomas Maier takes a fresh look at sex researchers Masters and Johnson

By Dwight Garner
New York Times
Posted: 07/16/2009 12:00:00 AM PDT
Updated: 07/17/2009 04:35:07 PM PDT

By Dwight Garner
New York Times
It's hard to believe, but the word "clitoris" did not appear in Playboy magazine until 1968, in an interview with Masters and Johnson, the famous sex researchers.
Two years earlier, the pair had published "Human Sexual Response," their first book, based on more than 10 years of clinical research. It was a bestseller, and it rattled the culture in much the same way the first Kinsey Report had in 1948.
Alfred Kinsey compiled his information from surveys. His work was sociology. William Masters and Virginia Johnson actually watched people — a lot of people — have sex, with heart monitors and other gizmos attached to their subjects' bodies. Here was science. Here was raw data that steamed America's frozen peas.
"Human Sexual Response" wasn't easy or especially titillating reading, Thomas Maier points out in his new book, "Masters of Sex: The Life and Times of William Masters and Virginia Johnson, the Couple Who Taught America How to Love." Masters and Johnson wanted their work to be taken seriously, and wanted to stay a step ahead of the morality police, so they tended to write in almost comically dense medicalese.
Their books speak of "mounting episodes," of "stimulative approach opportunities" and "vocalized performance concerns." Barry White this was not.
Still, the big news in "Human Sexual Response" jumped off the page. Women, compared to men, were veritable sexual athletes,
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capable of multiple orgasms. More shockingly, women reported more intense orgasms when they masturbated. Who needed men? (Before long, an office sign at Gloria Steinem's Ms. Magazine would read, ''It's 10 o'clock at night — do you know where your clitoris is?")
Male readers took some solace in the fact that Masters and Johnson dismissed the "widespread concept that ejaculation, whether accomplished through masturbation or coition, is detrimental to the physical condition of men in athletic training programs." They also noted that men with larger penises are not necessarily more effective lovers.
Masters and Johnson became famous. Other books followed, including "Human Sexual Inadequacy" and "The Pleasure Bond." In 1970 they appeared on the cover of Time magazine and came off as avuncular and funny. "The greatest form of sex education," Masters told Time, "is Pop walking past Mom in the kitchen and patting her on the fanny, and Mom obviously liking it. The kids take a look at this action and think, 'Boy, that's for me.' "
They opened a clinic to treat sexual dysfunction, among the first in the country, and celebrities, among others, flocked to it. Their clients included the actress Barbara Eden, Maier writes, as well as Gov. George Wallace of Alabama, after he had been shot in an assassination attempt.
Behind Masters and Johnson's success, however, is a long and frequently disquieting story, one that is told with patience and care by Maier. Masters met Johnson in 1956. He was 41, a married professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Washington University in St. Louis and a distinguished surgeon. She was a twice-divorced 31-year-old former singer without a college degree, who had simply applied to be his assistant.
"Why me? I still don't quite know," Johnson said later. "I just became the princess."
It was a professional marriage that worked. At the time, Masters was shifting from gynecology to sex research, a nearly empty field. He knew he needed a female perspective, especially after a woman told him she sometimes faked her orgasms, a claim that utterly baffled him. "You really need an interpreter," she told him.
Johnson was not aware of Masters' sex studies when she was hired but proved to be a perfect partner. She humanized the famously aloof Masters, was a quick learner and had a gift for putting people at ease while asking the most intimate questions.
It was a different world in the late 1950s. There was an aversion to speaking about sex in public, much less studying it in private. Their research became the subject of rumors on the Washington University campus, and they soon left to open their own nonprofit research center. Some of the rumors were true. Bill Masters made it clear to Virginia Johnson — or Gini, as many people called her — that having sex with him was part of her job. They would study their own human sexual responses.
In 1971, after being married for 29 years, Masters left his wife and married Johnson. The pair entered a relationship that seemed charmed on the outside — Shana Alexander, writing in Newsweek, called them "the Ma and Pa Kettle of sex therapists" — but was essentially loveless.
In 1993, Masters divorced Johnson to marry his high-school sweetheart. He died in 2001, at 85, after suffering for many years from Parkinson's disease. Johnson tried to open a new clinic in the late 1990s, but it failed. She is now in her 80s.
"Masters of Sex" can be, at times, depressing reading. Neither Masters nor Johnson, it seems, led particularly happy or well-adjusted lives. But there's no denying that they added greatly to the enjoyment of many other people's time on this planet.
Maier writes well, and with good humor, about their struggles and frequent successes. They got very good at what they did. One former colleague, only slightly exaggerating, says of Masters: "Bill could look at somebody and say 'Have an erection!' and they would."
MASTERS OF SEX:
The Life and Times
of William Masters
and Virginia Johnson,
the Couple
Who Taught America How to Love
By Thomas Maier
Basic Books,
411 pp., $27.50

Thursday, July 9, 2009

National Academy of Science - Beckman Center lecture in Irvine, California "The Science of Masters and Johnson"


National Academy of Science, Beckman Center lecture.
Wednesday, May 20, 7:00 pm
"Science of Masters & Johnson"

Critically acclaimed biographer Thomas Maier offers an unprecedented look at Masters and Johnson and their pioneering work together based on laboratory observation of sexual behavior. Masters and Johnson explained the physiology of human sexual response and revolutionized treatment methods for impotency, premature ejaculation, and other “dysfunctions”—a term they coined. The talk will highlight interviews with the notoriously private William Masters and Virginia Johnson and show how this unusual team changed the way we all thought about, talked about, and engaged in sex. A book signing will follow the event.

Saturday, July 4, 2009

In China, it's "Love Guru" instead of "Masters of Sex." Is this Another Example of Communist Censorship? Mr. Publisher, Tear down That Wall!



Here's the Chinese translation from a review in ChinaTimes.com about my bio "Masters of Sex" which has been renamed "Love Guru" for the Chinese. I hope the local phrase sounds better than it does to these ears here in New York. Thanks for the Google translation, here's what the story says...


After Kinsey's sexology By Master hippie movement just to the beginning of 1966, the United States appeared in a book "of human sexual response" (Human Sexual Response). Report this sex accumulated more than 10 years of observational study, immediately after the introduction of which caused a sensation comparable to a 1948 article, "The Kinsey Report," released at the event. "Human sexual response," the author is William obstetricians.麦斯特斯(William Masters) and his assistant维吉妮亚.Johnson (Virginia Johnson), a diploma is not even the first singer. Just published by the end of June in "Love Guru" (Masters of Sex) to say that these two "how to teach Americans to love the partner," the life and legacy. Thomas by the reporter of this.Mel (Thomas Maier) biography authored, in addition to research and explain their love life, but also expose a lot of sex related anecdotes. For example, Kinsey is the use of questionnaires to obtain information, but Johnson麦斯特斯and field observations have sex, who were covered in a variety of sensors, but also make sexual intercourse in the first internal photos of women. In order for works to be taken seriously, who blocked the mouth Wei Road, "the human sexual response" in terms of academic science was almost a bit ridiculous, but this classic is the most revolutionary discovery is: sex is more like women than men athletes, not only able to climax several times, but when masturbationWill enjoy a stronger pleasure. Poor men had no choice but to get some make up from this point: as in the past, that masturbation is not as unhealthy. Johnson麦斯特斯and become famous overnight, and then a book is also a 1970, also boarded the "Time" magazine cover. However, later research by the client from bad to worse: in 1979 the "homosexual observation" (Homosexuality in Perspective) that homosexuality can be treated; in 1988 the "crisis" (Crisis: Heterosexual Behavior in the Age of AIDS) is also that the Government has successfully prevent AIDS, was approved critics as "the classic book of terror

UK Spectator: NYT's "fascinating" review of Masters of Sex


Documenting It
FRIDAY, 3RD JULY 2009
Everything you ever wanted to know about sex researchers, but were afraid to ask... The NYT has a fascinating review of a biography of Masters & Johnson. I always used to think they were a kind of baby lotion:
Can the life of a man who spent most of the waking hours of his adult life either having sex, watching sex or talking sex be sad? The answer, as we see in Thomas Maier’s eye-opening “Masters of Sex” is a resounding yes.
Their most detailed experiments were conducted in their own bed:
Having stripped to the skin, Masters “instructed Gini to remain as professional as possible,” and told her that “these encounters should not venture beyond the scope of scientific inquiry,” Maier writes... They would be married for 20 years, pretending to the American public that they were an ideal pair of lovebirds. Meanwhile they never used the word “love,” which Masters considered imprecise and inappropriate. Both knew what their relationship was about: the success of their product... They were as famous as Kleenex, Johnson boasted.