Skip to main content

Tina Brown Takeover at Newsweek Reminds of Her Challenges at Vanity Fair, as Recalled in "Newhouse" bio


The return of Tina Brown to the world of print magazine journalism, taking over the reins of Newsweek, reminds us of her 1980s revival of Vanity Fair as recounted in my biography "Newhouse", voted best media book of 1994 (my, how Time flies!). Tina's exclusive interview for this book recounts the excitement of that era. She was really the only one of the top Newhouse people who actually would agree to be interviewed for that book. I interviewed Tina at breakfast at the Royalton, in the velvet booth where she would hold court in those days. She followed up with some conversation over the phone, and it was a fascinating tutorial on what makes a great editor. But I think today's era of iPad, video and print journalism is far more challenging, even for someone as talented as Tina Brown. Here's Jack Shafer's account in Slate, which I think very accurately sums up Tina Brown's appeal and loyalty in the media world.

Popular posts from this blog

Kick Kennedy & Pam Churchill : A Fateful, Dynastic Friendship Between Two Daughters of the Two Famous Families

Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy, the favorite sister of future U.S. president John F. Kennedy, and Pamela Churchill, the daughter-in-law of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, enjoyed one of the closest relationships between the two world famous families -- one filled with passion, politics, humor and ultimately tragedy. This is an excerpt from “When Lions Roar: The Churchills and the Kennedys” by Thomas Maier.
Winston Churchill and wife Clementine with Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy during 1946 Florida trip. Credit: JFK Library.
After the war, Kick Kennedy and Pamela Churchill’s friendship grew closer. They were no longer vaguely familiar debutantes with little in common but rather an American widow and British divorcée, both in their mid-twenties, whose experiences and social circles in war-torn London had bonded them together. With her family in America, Kick still maintained the good-girl veneer that her mother insisted upon. On her own in London, she’d become more independent-minded, espec…

What Nucky Thompson of Boardwalk Empire Didn’t Know About Joe Kennedy Before He Died. The Secret Boozy Deals of A Kennedy, A Churchill and A Roosevelt. Now in Time Magazine

The Secret Boozy Deals of A Kennedy, A Churchill and A Roosevelt. Now in Time Magazine:
The Real-Life Story Is Revealed in A New Book, “WHEN LIONS ROAR: The Churchills and the Kennedys” by Thomas Maier.


Boardwalk Empire, HBO’s television drama set in the Prohibition era, unveiled a new  character this season -- a fictionalized Joe Kennedy, father of future President John F. Kennedy. The TV show capitalizes on the elder Kennedy’s long-rumored reputation as a bootlegger. His fictionalized character tells Nucky Thompson, played by actor Steve Buschemi, about his big plan to sell British liquor in America when Prohibition ends in 1933. "Gambling implies risk,” the fictional Kennedy tells Nucky, “I take the risk out of it.” But the real story about Joe Kennedy’s British liquor deal -- untold until now -- is even more remarkable than the one portrayed on Boardwalk Empire. In his new book “WHEN LIONS ROAR: The Churchills and the Kennedys,” investigative reporter Thomas Maier reveals how t…

The Perfume King and The Scent of Love: Read This Excerpt from "Masters of Sex"

“The Scent of Love” by Thomas Maier Excerpted from “Masters of Sex”

If birds and bees do it, then surely human beings rely on a sense of smell in sexual selection. Olfaction must play a hidden role in the allure between men and women, the sweet and musky odors that excite the senses and signal the inevitability of love. That was the long-held belief of Dr. William Masters and Virginia Johnson after years of study. Their second book, Human Sexual Inadequacy, underlined the “tremendous undeveloped potential” of smell in affecting human sexual behavior. Sex pheromones—scents that somehow sparked a natural behavioral response—remained uncharted territory in science. Yet food and fragrance companies, looking for possible methods to make money from this untapped chemistry of desire, turned to the Reproductive Biology Research Foundation run by Masters and Johnson. In a way that government refused to do, these private firms provided grant money to explore this missing link of sexual attraction. …